Thermoset Molding

Thermoset molding is a molding process in which pliable forms of plastic (powder/sheet/BMC) are forced into (compression/transfer compression/injection) a mold and formed into their final shape.

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Custom Thermoset Molding

Thermoset materials offer high mechanical strength, wide usable temperature range, and unique dielectric properties. Since this family of materials does not shrink significantly during the molding process, part geometry can include large cross-sectional areas without causing warpage and sink problems as occurs in thermoplastic molding.

Many thermoset materials don’t melt when heated. They “set” into a given shape when first made and afterward do not flow or melt, but rather decompose upon heating. They are often highly cross-linked polymers, with properties similar to those of network covalent solids, i.e, hard and strong.

Thermoset materials can provide a cost-effective alternative to machined parts.

Thermoset plastic

Thermoset Molding Process

Thermoset molding is almost the opposite of Thermoplastic Molding. Thermoset molding typically requires a “hot” mold and a relatively “cold” material. Thermoset molding material is similar to cake and batter once molded it will not return to batter. It can not be reground like thermoplastic can. Once the thermoset material is set it can not be re-molded.

Thermoset
Advantages

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High Heat Tolerance

Because Thermoset polymers cross-link during the curing process they form a chemical bond that cannot be broken or melted when under extreme heat conditions.

Dimensional stability

Thermoset parts are much less vulnerable to relaxation or creep failure than that of a thermoplastic part.

Dielectric properties

Thermoset materials typically display exceptional dielectric strength. This is due to the chemical bonds that hold the crosslinked molecule structures firmly in place.

Strong & Durable

Thermoset materials display high strength-to-weight ratio and performance.

Frequently Asked Questions

Very common thermoset plastics are polyurethane, epoxy, silicone, and phenolic.
Thermoset and thermoplastics are both plastic polymers. The main distinction is that thermoplastics will lose their form if heated after curing, whereas thermoset will remain solid when heated after cured.

Thermoset can be either injection or compression molded. The choice really depends on the end-use of the part. 

thermoset molding company

The Moldtronics Difference

With Moldtronics vast experience, our in-house molding, tooling, machining, and assembly capabilities we bring your project on-line sooner and help eliminate costly roadblocks.

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Ready to see Moldtronics in action?

We’re ready to help with your project. Reach out today and let’s get moving! 

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